Graphic of the BEP Seal
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
U.S. Department of the Treasury

Pictured below: Shrink-wrapped packages of one dollar notes.
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Small Denominations
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$1 Note
$1 Note
$2 Note
$2 Note
$5 Note
$5 Note
$10 Note
$10 Note
$20 Note
$20 Note
$50 Note
$50 Note
$100 Federal Reserve Note
$100 Note
Currency Facts
  • The basic face and back designs of all denominations of United States paper currency, except the back of the $1 and $2 denominations in general circulation today, were adopted in 1928.

 

  • The front of the notes feature portraits of famous, deceased American statesmen: George Washington on the $1 note, Thomas Jefferson on the $2 note, Abraham Lincoln on the $5 note, Alexander Hamilton on the $10 note, Andrew Jackson on the $20 note, Ulysses Grant on the $50 note, and Benjamin Franklin on the $100 note. The backs of the notes feature images reflective of the history of our nation: The Great Seal of the United States on the $1 note, the signing of the Declaration of Independence on the $2 note, the Lincoln Memorial on the $5 note, The Treasury Building on the $10 note, the White House on the $20 note, the Capitol on the $50 note, and Independence Hall on the $100 note.

  • The motto "In God We Trust" first appeared on U.S. coins in 1864. However, it was not until 1955 that a law was passed, which stated that thereafter all new designs for coins and currency would bear that inscription.

 

  • The $100 note has been the largest denomination of currency in circulation since 1969.

 

  • The obverse and reverse of the Great Seal of the United States appeared in a currency design for the first time when the $1 Silver Certificate, Series 1935, was issued. The Seal dates back to 1782 - before the Constitution.

 

  • A new series year designation will result from a change in the Secretary of the Treasury; the Treasurer of the United States; and/or a significant change to the note's appearance such as a new currency design.

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